From poster boy to unpopular: Trudeau’s popularity dips as poll puts Poilievre as the preferred choice for Canada PM

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  • Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is losing popularity. 
  • The poll gives an indication that Conservatives have a high chance of getting a majority to form the government in the next elections in 2025. 
  • 40 percent of Canadians want to see opposition leader Pierre Poilievre as the Prime Minister 
  • According to an Ipsos poll, 30 percent voted for Justin Trudeau 
  • Meanwhile, another survey in July revealed that Trudeau is considered the worst Prime Minister in 50 years. 

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is losing popularity. A recent poll by Ipsos found that 40 percent of Canadians want to see opposition leader Pierre Poilievre, a Conservative, as the Prime Minister, while 30 percent vote for Justin Trudeau.

The report shows that if an election were to occur today, Poilievre’s Conservatives are projected to secure 39 percent of the total vote count. This places them clearly ahead of the current Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s Liberal Party, who according to the poll, would obtain only 30 percent of votes.

It shows that the Conservative Party of Canada, led by Pierre Poilievre, is currently in the lead over the Liberal Party of Canada, led by Justin Trudeau. The poll also shows that Poilievre is personally more popular than Trudeau.

If polls are taken now, the Conservatives will win a majority government, deposing the Trudeau-led Liberal minority government. Elections in Canada are scheduled for the autumn of 2025. Meanwhile, another survey in July revealed that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is considered the worst Prime Minister in over half a century by a section of Canadian voters.

This revelation creates a stark contrast to the legacy of his father, Pierre Trudeau. Pierre Trudeau, who held the position of Prime Minister from 1968-1979 and again from 1980-1984, was revered among the Canadian populace during his tenure, as reported by a news channel. With charismatic leadership and a vision for a unified Canada, he won over both his constituents and critics.

The latest polls come as a concerning factor for Trudeau, who is accused of being soft and non-committal about acting against Khalistani elements, often brushing it off as “freedom of expression”. This is a sensitive issue for both Canada and India. India has accused Canada of harbouring Sikh separatists, while Canada has defended its right to freedom of expression.

At Delhi’s recent G20 Summit, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi confronted Canada’s Justin Trudeau about the rising “anti-India activities” linked to extremist groups in Canada.

While Trudeau’s remarks on India’s involvement in the killing of Nijjar enraged India, they appear to have struck a chord among Canadian Sikhs living in Surrey, British Columbia, which is known as a hub of Khalistani activity. The Sikh community, Canada’s largest outside of India, has lauded Trudeau as a “hero” and said he is “vocalizing” about their concerns.

India on Thursday announced temporarily suspending the issuance of visas to Canadian citizens in view of “security threats” faced by its high commission and consulates in Canada, amid an escalating diplomatic row over Ottawa’s allegations relating to the killing of a Khalistani separatist on Canadian soil.

The row erupted following Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s allegations of a “potential” involvement of Indian agents in the killing of a Khalistani separatist in Hardeep Singh Nijjar in June. India has rejected the charge as absurd.

(With inputs from agencies)

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